Global Michigan

Ask me anything   Sharing stories, photos and videos about the University of Michigan's global engagement.

umindia:

On a beautiful fall day, several Indian students groups came to talk about their organizations and their tryouts at the #festifall event at University of Michigan.

— 1 week ago with 3 notes
The breathtaking Basque Country of Northern Spain. Photo taken by Alexis Shandler when she was an engineering student at the University of Michigan. More student photos.  

The breathtaking Basque Country of Northern Spain. Photo taken by Alexis Shandler when she was an engineering student at the University of Michigan. More student photos.  

— 1 week ago with 3 notes
#Basque Country  #Spain  #University of Michigan  #student photography  #student travel  #study abroad  #education abroad 
Tom Sargeantson was one of 19 fellows who participated in the William Davidson Institute’s Global Impact Internship program in the summer of 2014.  He was in Hanoi working for the Vietnam Business Challenge Fund, which helps Vietnam’s private sector develop innovative business models. Like the other WDI fellows, Sargeantson blogged about his experiences. Enjoy his wrap-up post.

Tom Sargeantson was one of 19 fellows who participated in the William Davidson Institute’s Global Impact Internship program in the summer of 2014.  He was in Hanoi working for the Vietnam Business Challenge Fund, which helps Vietnam’s private sector develop innovative business models. Like the other WDI fellows, Sargeantson blogged about his experiences. Enjoy his wrap-up post.

— 1 week ago
#Vietnam  #internships  #global internships  #study abroad  #University of Michigan  #roadtrips 
Kite enthusiasts from around the world came to Ferrara, Italy, to fly their colorful “aquiloni” at the Vulandra International Kite Festival. Photo by Diana Bach, graduate student instructor in civil and environmental engineering at the University of Michigan. For more photos, check out: global.umich.edu

Kite enthusiasts from around the world came to Ferrara, Italy, to fly their colorful “aquiloni” at the Vulandra International Kite Festival. Photo by Diana Bach, graduate student instructor in civil and environmental engineering at the University of Michigan. For more photos, check out: global.umich.edu

— 2 weeks ago
#Italy  #study abroad  #student photography  #University of Michgan 
Follow our Ethiopia blog

My name is William Foreman. I write about research and initiatives that the University of Michigan is involved with worldwide. I’m traveling in Ethiopia on July 12-22, 2014, to describe U-M’s rapidly expanding partnerships in the East African country. More than 20 units across the university have collaborative projects underway with Ethiopian colleagues. I’ll be traveling with my colleague Austin Thomason, a senior photographer with Michigan Photography, who will help me tell the story with photos and videos.

For much of my life, I’ve been fascinated with Ethiopia….MORE

— 1 month ago
#Ethiopia  #Africa  #medicine  #health care 
Florence inspirations →

sandyinternational:

Gina’s keeping a daily blog during her studies in Florence.  See her sketches and paintings from several museums in Florence! 

U-M Stamps School of Art & Design students find inspiration in all corners of the globe but a favorite destination is Florence, where creating art and studying historic art seamlessly blend with contemporary life.

— 1 month ago with 2 notes

Leave it to the Japanese to pull off something like this, marrying speed metal with bubblegum girly pop. I love the dance moves, especially the singers’ hand gestures.

(Source: youtube.com)

— 2 months ago with 2 notes

Who came up with the term ‘soccer?’

ANN ARBOR – Americans use the word “soccer” to describe the game that just about everybody else in the world calls “football,” and this duel over semantics enrages purists of the game.

But few realize that the word soccer actually originated in Britain in the late 19th century, said Stefan Szymanski, a University of Michigan professor in the School of Kinesiology. MORE

— 3 months ago
#world cup  #football  #futbol  #soccer 

ANN ARBOR—Mary Sue Coleman, president of the University of Michigan, is the recipient of the 2014 Cassandra Pyle Award that honors her lifelong impact on international education.

Coleman, who retires in July after serving 12 years as U-M’s president, received the award from NAFSA: Association of International Educators, one of the world’s largest organizations promoting global education and exchange. MORE

— 3 months ago with 2 notes
#University of Michigan  #NAFSA  #international education  #President Mary Sue Coleman 
Making sense of India’s election results

For the first time in 30 years, a single party has received majority to form a government in India. Narendra Modi from the Bhartiya Janata Party (BJP) is projected to be the next prime minister. Modi defeated the Congress Party led by Rahul Ghandhi, promising to crackdown on corruption and revive the economy. 

These University of Michigan experts can discuss the election: 

Juan Cole, professor of history, is interested in Indian-Pakistan relations and the politics and culture of the Indian sub-continent.

“With the U.S. withdrawing from Afghanistan, the potential for Indo-Pak rivalry in that country is likely enhanced with a more nationalist party in New Delhi. Still, some observers have suggested that incoming Prime Minister Narendra Modi may be less hawkish on foreign policy than was the case with the last BJP government, and more focused on economic advances and energy issues.”

Leela Fernandes, professor of political science, studies the relationship between politics and culture. She doubts that the election marks the end of the Gandhi dynasty.  

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“The extent of the Congress’ route also is a consequence of the failure of Rahul Gandhi to mount an effective electoral campaign. As long as the Congress relies on the Gandhi family, dynastic influences will continue.” 

“The more significant issues at hand are what the elections mean for the future of Indian politics. The presence of a strong opposition party is as important to a strong democracy as the ability to produce a stable government with a clear majority for a single party.”

Brian Min: assistant professor of political science, studies the political economy of development, with a focus on the politics of energy, ethnic politics and civil conflict.

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“This is a landmark moment for Indian democracy. The results demonstrate that voters are willing to sharply change course, abandoning Congress which has stood for decades as the party of the masses.”

“Congress’s strategy to lure rural voters by promising lavish new spending did not work this time around. It no longer seems that Indians feel locked into voting for the same party over and over.”

JOURNALISTS: If you would like to interview the professors, contact Mandira Banerjee (mandirab@umich.edu) or William Foreman (wforeman@umich.edu).



— 4 months ago with 3 notes
#india  #India politics  #India election